souridealist said: Excuse me - I was reading Cartographer's Craft recently for the first time (I needed beach reading!) and it got me really curious about how Animagus Winter changed as it turned into Nameless, because it seems to have been a fair bit. Is there a post talking about that somewhere, by any chance? because I am very interested.

copperbadge:

Oh man, I wish I had documented it as I went.

For those of you who don’t have all the context on this, the fanfic Cartographer’s Craft is here; in it there is an OC named Ellis Graveworthy, a novelist who wrote several books that are key to the story, which you can read about here if you don’t want to read 43 chapters of Harry Potter AU fanfic. One of those books, Animagus Winter, became the skeletal structure of my first original novel, Nameless.

So, Nameless and Animagus Winter. There is some discussion of the process of writing Nameless in the afterword of the book, which you can read for free here. (If you like the book, consider buying a copy!)

But how did Animagus Winter get to be Nameless? Trigger warnings for discussion of depression and suicide behind the cut. Yay, let’s tell a cheery story…

Read More

notfadeaway said: I'm working on a script for a comic I'm creating. My cast is primarily female and I'm worried I have too many women. When you're writing CM (since your cast is largely female) do you ever think, "there should be a guy in here somewhere?" And if so, what do you do? I'm really comfortable writing women, and I love my characters... I see no need for anymore men in the story at this time, but I'm afraid it won't appeal to a large enough audience. 3 prominent women to 1 supporting male? Too much?

rosalarian:

racheldukes:

upthecatpunx:

kellysue:

>too many women

I’m sorry, I don’t know what those words mean in that order. 

>do you ever think, “there should be a guy in here somewhere?”

No. 

>I see no need for anymore men in the story at this time, but I’m afraid it won’t appeal to a large enough audience.

STOP IT. 

You’re trying to sell a thing you haven’t even written yet.  Write the story you would write if you were just going to put it in a drawer.  

Write the story you want to read. 

Lumberjanes is all women and is kicking ass. So, no, there is no such thing as “too many women” in a story.

I love Lumberjanes.

Write the story you would write if you were just going to put it in a drawer.” Ahhhhhhhh that’s such good advice! And also good advice on there not being such a thing as too many women in a story. We’re still so vastly underrepresented, and women want to read stories about ourselves. The only people who are gonna complain are jerks and who even cares what they think?

YESSSS
People rarely think “there are too many men in this story”.

Ref: pretty much every caper or superhero story of the past tumpty years.

cupiscent:

maggie-stiefvater:

Novelist error messages.

So many of these error messages show up in my life as, “…I’m asking my writing group for help.”

My writing group are always right. They are also omnipotent and have superpowers.

It’s hard to take this scene I’m writing in this novel seriously, because apparently I have my slash goggles stapled to my face.

coelasquid:

elitepurple:

rosalarian:

coelasquid:

Let us take a moment to remember that having an idea for a story, or even an entire story plotted from start to finish in your head does not, in itself, make you a writer. It does not make you a writer any more than thinking about a nice image in your head makes you an artist. You are not a writer until you actually write those ideas down and come to understand that transferring words from your head to a piece of paper and keeping them intact and engaging can be exactly as challenging and frustrating as doing the same with images.

I’ve been doing a lot of writing lately and every :30 seconds I just want to hurl myself into the sun.



I’m taking the Nope Train away from this station. This came across as de-motivational. How about …

“Let us take a moment to remember that having an idea for a story, or even an entire story plotted from start to finish in your head does, in fact, make you a writer. It makes you as much of a writer just like how thinking about a nice image in your head makes you an artist.” 

If someone can think a whole story in their head and see such beautiful art, that makes them even more so than what people would label other’s as artist/writers. Why do people have to see everyone’s talent to acknowledge who they are? We are all special and unique in our own ways and some stories and pictures are just too beautiful to ever write down or draw no matter how talented we are.

Sometimes I think about outer space and tell people I’m an astronaut.

YES. SO MUCH THIS.

I guess I should get back to work on that damn novel I’ve been avoiding.

When I get a critique on a new piece


title2come:

My first reaction…

And then I try and calm down…

Until I can finally just be like…

AHAHAHAHA IT’S TRUUUUUE

Oops: A Tragedy. Or, Get The Fuck Off Tumblr.


So I was meant to be working on my novel. Or at least preparing the chapter that I’m bringing to my workshopping group on Thursday night. Instead I read Tumblr for a hour.

Oops?

cupiscent:

This is my bargain, you mewling quim.

I was once told that Draco Malfoy couldn’t be my favourite HP character because he wasn’t a good guy, despite my reasoning that he was interesting, well-developed, excellently crafted for the space he held in the story.

This line is pure vicious malevolence, and that’s why I love it. It’s beautifully crafted, wonderfully delivered, and says so much about where Loki’s at (the depths of hatred and vitriol he’s steeped in), and even more about Clint and Natasha (and how much he understands of that, becauses there’s the suckerpunch: Loki can only make the most perfectly horrifying threats because he understands).

What she said. Besides, you can appreciate and love a character, but that doesn’t mean you approve of their actions or would want to hang around them in real life.

(Source: mittthrawnuruodo)

fyodorpavlov:

swinku:

My friend Vita had a pretty good argument about this, that I mostly remembered sort of… It was better when she said it.
But the point being do I have to have excuses if I write straight male characters? NO, so no excuses for drawing as many queer characters as I want to draw.

Uhm wow, so reblogging for truth. I used to ask myself this crap all the time with Baritarian Boy and other projects - “oh man, we just made another gay/bi/queer character, should we do that, is that believable, are there too many etc.” Fuck that. Someone’s got to balance out all the white cisgendered males in comics and fiction. And to be honest, I could even try harder, I think.

I need to remember this. When I was bringing the noir book to my writer’s group (The Firm), I was feeling all self-conscious because I’d just realised I had another book in the works that also centred on a lesbian detective. I felt like I was repeating myself, even though the two books, and the two characters, are nothing alike.

fyodorpavlov:

swinku:

My friend Vita had a pretty good argument about this, that I mostly remembered sort of… It was better when she said it.

But the point being do I have to have excuses if I write straight male characters? NO, so no excuses for drawing as many queer characters as I want to draw.

Uhm wow, so reblogging for truth. I used to ask myself this crap all the time with Baritarian Boy and other projects - “oh man, we just made another gay/bi/queer character, should we do that, is that believable, are there too many etc.” Fuck that. Someone’s got to balance out all the white cisgendered males in comics and fiction. And to be honest, I could even try harder, I think.

I need to remember this. When I was bringing the noir book to my writer’s group (The Firm), I was feeling all self-conscious because I’d just realised I had another book in the works that also centred on a lesbian detective. I felt like I was repeating myself, even though the two books, and the two characters, are nothing alike.